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Dharma of Food Justice: Call For Submissions!

people's grocery food justice

From Thich Nhat Hanh’s famous tangerine meditation, to Vandana Shiva and the Navdanya network’s subversive seed saving, to urban farming, landless peasant organizing, and efforts to liberate sentient beings from factory farms, the realm of food justice contains innumerable dharma doors.   Food and food justice help us reflect on the meaning of profound teachings: interdependence, impermanence, generosity, right action.  Through a spiritual lens, we analyze and resist the institutional oppressions that perpetuate racist, classist, ableist, and sexist exploitation, pollution, food and water scarcity, malnutrition, and poisonous foods.  In our explorations of the dharma, we honor nature as more than just a resource. We seek to (re)establish harmonious relations of healing and wellness among all beings and the land, skies, and waters.  To do this, we know we must take action to transform the status quo at the systemic level.

For the month of July at Turning Wheel Media, help us highlight issues of food justice!  Submit your prose, poetry, photographs, interviews, video, audio, and multi-media work by June 15th to submissions@turningwheelmedia.org. We welcome submissions from Buddhist, spiritual, and secular perspectives, though we will usually prioritize work grounded in Buddhadharma.  We will also prioritize work with strong analysis of racism, gender and sexuality justice, ableism, capitalism / class war, and internationalism.  Please read our submission guidelines, and send in your work by the deadline of 15 June 2012!

With gratitude, toward the liberation of all beings,

Turning Wheel Media

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[Top Photo: A mural and urban harvests from the People’s Grocery in West Oakland, CA. by Katie Loncke]

Update 5/25: As a gentle reminder — because when issues of food arise, fatphobia often follows — we ask contributors to mindfully avoid citing “weight loss” or “thinness” as a benefit of mindful eating, or access to healthier foods.  We’d love to keep health emphasis on health, and bodily self-determination on bodily self-determination: not on weight or size as a proxy.  Let us know if you have any questions around this; we’re happy to talk more. Thank you!

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© 2012 Buddhist Peace Fellowship

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